Questions for Peer Review

Read all 3 introductions on a page.

Choose the paragraph you like the most and put a star next to it. Write a note at the bottom. Why is that one good?

Choose a sentence in one of the others that you think is particularly good.
Underline it.

If there is anything you did not get or did not understand, put a ? next to it.

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What have people been certain about–and right?

Science:
Louis Pasteur believed he could come up with a vaccine to counteract rabies.
Mesopotamian and Mayan scientists believed there was a solar year and a lunar month and that they could create an accurate calendar.

History:
George Washington believed the new country did not need a lifetime ruler in order to succeed.
The French believed helping the Americans against the British would make the British weaker.

Personal life:
My husband believed that homeschooling our sons would allow them to get the best education.
My dad believed that calling his parents once a week was a good way to show that he honored them.

Education:
Teachers believed that testing students helped them retain the material.
The United States believed that requiring the population to attend school would increase literacy.

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What have people been certain about–and wrong?

History:
President Andrew Jackson was certain giving smallpox-laden blankets to the American Indians was the right thing to do.
Lots of folks are still sure that prior to 1492 most of the Western world believed the earth was flat.
The Chicago Daily Tribune was sure that Dewey would win the election, rather than Harry S. Truman.

Literature:
Green Lantern was sure that Batman couldn’t be a real superhero because he was just a guy in a bat costume.
“The Story of an Hour” everyone was sure the husband was dead.

Personal life:
Sure my college crush was going to be my life partner. (Nope…)
Sure I was never going to get married.
Sure I could not have children, since the doctors said so.

Science:
Folks were sure that the earth was the center of the solar system–and the universe.
They were also sure that the body contained four humors and if those were in proportion, you would be well.
Most believed in spontaneous generation–that life came from inanimate life.

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Introductory Paragraph ideas

You can put lots of different things in an introductory paragraph.

  • Background (of the subject or how you came to want to talk about it)
  • Story (related to the topic, relating an example of what you are going to talk about)
  • Dialogue (people talking about the topic)
  • Definition (what you are going to be talking about)
  • Not-definition (the opposite of what you are going to be talking about)
  • Quotation (something related to the topic, with who said it and, if their profession or position is relevant, what that is/was)
  • Snippet (of a song or poem or story that is related to the topic)
  • Summary (of something that is related to the topic)
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Definitions of Rhetoric

Dr. Lunsford‘s collection

Dr. Goggin‘s list

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Major British Writers Experience Survey

Click here to take survey

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B&P Writing Examples

TCE: Weblinks for Writing Procedures
1st link: Technical Writing: How To’s, Tutorials, and Directions
Writing How-To’s is a good, text-based guide to writing instructions.
2nd link: Alternatives to the paragraph
Read Be Concise to see how much you actually need to write.

http://www.teachingcollegeenglish.com/2008/04/19/7-things-to-avoid/
Parallelism issues in headings were on purpose. (Students were supposed to notice.) Ask students to rewrite the headings so that they are parallel.

BBC and overuse of warnings links do not work

http://www.teachingcollegeenglish.com/2008/04/21/worst-ever-winners/

Poor directions and manual-writing examples.

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APA Dating

Dates for magazines, newsletters, and newspapers should include “the year and the exact date of the publication (month or month and day),” according to the APA Publication Manual (6th ed., 6.28, p. 185). This means that the month should be given for monthlies, and the month and day for weeklies. If the periodical uses a season with the year, put the year, a comma, and the season in parentheses (2008, Early Spring).

from Blog.APAStyle.org

So anything published at least every month (and therefore also more often) must include whatever dating information is available.

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Document Design

Overview PDF: document design.

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Good General Fairy Tale Source

This is a good source for a general overview that you might use to help with your introduction.

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